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5 Things to Keep Your Production Simple

5 Things to Keep Your Production Simple

Often in amateur theatre, over-complicated sequences can be over ambitious and do more harm than good in a performance. Often the key to a successful moment is to keep it simple, it must feel simple to the audience and actors.

Use lighting and sound effects only where necessary

It’s very easy to get carried away and allow the lighting and sound to get in the way of what’s happening on stage. One of the amateur pantomime’s I saw this season essentially flashed lights on and off during every song of the piece and it meant that we lost half the action as the actors were in the dark. Keep it simple, use lighting effects only where needed and ensure you have someone who really knows what they’re doing with the lighting design.

[bctt tweet=”Keep it simple, use lighting effects only where needed” username=”jnpantoscripts”]

Set Design

It’s a very similar story with the stage design for a show. Whether you’re performing a Pantomime or a Play, it is essential that your set works really well. Often a static set which works throughout the show is more effective than a complicated set with lots of scene changes and bits that could take time and hold up the action. Also, if you can avoid my pet-hate of backstage crew being scene on stage that’s always a good thing!

[bctt tweet=”Whether you’re performing a Pantomime or a Play, it is essential that your set works really well.” username=”jnpantoscripts”]

Choreography

It’s always spectacular if you have some really impressive dances in your show, but only if they are pulled off really well. A slightly simpler choreography or routine might be more appropriate if your cast are struggling a little to keep up. Better a simpler routine pulled-off well than a complicated one pulled off badly.

[bctt tweet=”A slightly simpler choreography or routine might be more appropriate if your cast are struggling a little to keep up.” username=”jnpantoscripts”]

Front of House

Lots of amateur theatre groups forget that Front of House is a really important part of the audience’s experience when seeing your show. Often FOH areas can be busy and difficult to navigate before a show. Strong signage and clear FOH staff can help with this. Clear access to toilets, exits and the bar is essential, not forgetting the box office!

[bctt tweet=”Often FOH areas can be busy and difficult to navigate before a show. ” username=”jnpantoscripts”]

Harmonies

Audiences are always really impressed when harmonies are delivered and it can be a real show-stealer on particular numbers. Making sure harmonies are tricky enough to challenge the cast but easy enough to be correct on stage and really impressive is down to the musical director. Finding a musical director who understands this and achieves it can be tricky but once you do, you’re onto a winner.

[bctt tweet=”Finding a musical director who understands this and achieves it can be tricky.” username=”jnpantoscripts”]

Often the rule is that the simpler, the better. If something is carried off well then both the actors and the audience will be happy.

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