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3 Helpful Tips for Recruiting and Keeping Members

3 Helpful Tips for Recruiting and Keeping Members

3 Helpful Tips for Recruiting and Keeping Members

The members are the life blood of any amateur theatre group and recruiting new ones is the often arduous task we all must go through to keep things alive and well. There’s some easy things that you can do to increase the uptake in membership and broaden the skills and age groups that you recruit. Here are my suggestions for keeping a healthy, active membership.

Community Recognition

If your amateur theatre group is active and recognisable in the local community then potential members are likely to know what you do and what the group is like. Portraying a friendly, community-lead atmosphere is a sure-fire win for recruiting new members. Also, make sure when you are out and about that your advertising the fact that you’re looking for new members. Often this marketing opportunity can be missed.

[bctt tweet=”If your amateur theatre group is active and recognisable in the local community then potential members are likely to join.” username=”jnpantoscripts”]

Social Events

Although ultimately its the shows and audiences that keep amateur theatre groups alive and kicking, it’s the social side of the society that really keeps everyone involved and happy. Morale boosting social events such as drinks after rehearsals, currys on Friday performance nights and day trips which could include supporting other local groups, are always popular events. Perhaps you’ve though of something different like paintball or a barbecue on the beach. There’s lots to do and if you get on well as a group and with the social side of things then you can count on members joining and staying more often.

[bctt tweet=”Morale boosting social events such as drinks after rehearsals, currys on Friday nights and day trips are great for member retention” username=”jnpantoscripts”]

Fair and Open Atmosphere

I feel really strongly about this post in particular. All too often in amateur theatre parts are distributed to friends and family over the best talent and most committed members. When I direct a production, all parts are cast because they are the best person for the role and feedback is offered to all auditions if they would like it. Auditions shouldn’t just be a casting method but a time for us all to improve. One thing I’ve tried in the past was to ask people to do two rounds of auditions. In between the two rounds I gave each audition some feedback and asked them to work on it for the second audition which gave me a really good idea of how receptive to feedback they were. This says a lot about their ability to be aware of what they are doing and how in control they are of their acting. Ultimately, all things in the group should be open and fair from the election of the committee to the way that shows are decided upon.

[bctt tweet=”All things in the group should be open and fair from the election of the committee to the way that shows are decided upon” username=”jnpantoscripts”]

If you can implement these simple steps towards a happier and more open amateur theatre group, then you’re sure to attract and keep members more often. I’d be happy to discuss how you achieve a better membership join and retention rate, just get in touch to ask for some help.

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